Gary K. Wolfe


Gary K. Wolfe
BornGary Kent Wolfe
March 24, 1946 (age 75)
Sedalia, Missouri, United States
OccupationWriter, professor, editor, critic
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction, biography

Gary K. Wolfe (born Gary Kent Wolfe in 1946) is an American science fiction editor, critic and biographer.[1] He is an emeritus Professor of Humanities in Roosevelt University's Evelyn T. Stone College of Professional Studies.[2]

Contents

Life


Wolfe was born on March 24, 1946, in Sedalia, Missouri. He moved to Carrollton, Missouri, at age 12, and to Springfield, at 14, where he finished high school. He began attending Southwest Missouri State College (now University), transferred to University of Kansas, where he earned a B.A. in English in 1968, and worked for his honors thesis under Professor James Gunn.

From there, he transferred to University of Chicago, where Wolfe earned a Ph.D. in English, in 1971.

He was married to Ellen "Dede" Weil, a teacher and community service activist, in 1996. They held another wedding celebration at the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts (ICFA) in a pool-side party, attended by many of their friends and colleagues, in March, 1997. Wolfe and Weil were happily married until her death in 2000. Before her death they collaborated on a book about Harlan Ellison, and often attended the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts, in Florida.[3]

He has been in a domestic partnership with Dale Hanes, a fellow science fiction critic and English professor, since 2009.

Writing career


Wolfe has written extensively about science fiction and fantasy literature; he is recognized as one of the experts in the field.[citation needed]

He has had a monthly review column in Locus since December, 1991[4] and has written for Salon and other sites. He collaborates with editor Jonathan Strahan on The Coode Street Podcast,[5] a "discussion and digression on science fiction and fantasy" that was launched in May 2010, and is syndicated at Tor.com.

In 2016, he taught the course How Great Science Fiction Works for The Great Courses.[6]

Honors


He was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Related Work in 2006 for the book Soundings, Reviews 1992–1996,[8] and again in 2011, for the book Bearings: Reviews 1997–2001.[9] In addition, along with Jonathan Strahan, The Coode Street Podcast has been nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Fancast six times.

Bibliography


Books

Book reviews

Date Review article Work(s) reviewed
2010 Wolfe, Gary K. (Jan 2010). "Locus Looks at Books". Locus (588): 15, 17, 45–46.
  • Bear, Greg (2009). Mariposa . Vanguard.
  • Powers, Richard (2009). Generosity : an enhancement. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  • Nojiri, Housuke (2009). Usurper of the sun . Haikasoru.
  • Jones, Gwyneth (2009). Imagination/space : essays and talks on fiction, feminism, technology, and politics. Aqueduct.
  • Andre-Driussi, Michael (2009). The Wizard Knight companion : a lexicon for Gene Wolfe's The Knight and The Wizard. Sirius Fiction.
2013 Wolfe, Gary K. (Dec 2013). "Locus Looks at Books". Locus (635): 16–17, 49–50.
  • Hartwell, David G., ed. (2013). Year's best SF 18. Tor.
  • Okorafor, Nnedi (2013). Kabu-kabu : stories. Prime.
  • Watts, Peter (2013). Beyond the Rift. Tachyon.
  • VanderMeer, Jeff (2013). Wonderbook : the illustrated guide to creating imaginative fiction. Abrams.

References


  1. ^ "Gary K. Wolfe ", Archipelicon, June 25–28, 2015. Retrieved 2019-09-13.
  2. ^ Roosevelt University, Gary K. Wolfe, Professor of Humanities Archived 2018-09-06 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ "Ellen Dede Weil". Locus. Locus. 45 (479, number 6): 72–73. December 2000.
  4. ^ Gary Wolfe biography from Readercon.org
  5. ^ The Coode Street Podcast
  6. ^ Professor Gary K. Wolfe, Ph.D. , The Great Courses. Retrieved 2019-09-13.
  7. ^ Science Fiction Research Association, Pilgrim Award . Retrieved 2019-09-13.
  8. ^ "2006 Hugo Awards" . World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19.
  9. ^ "2011 Hugo Awards" . World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2012-04-09. Retrieved 2012-04-09.
  10. ^ Sandner, David (2004). Fantastic Literature: A Critical Reader. Westport, Conn.: Praeger.

Further reading


External links









Categories: 1946 births | Living people | American speculative fiction critics | American speculative fiction editors | Science fiction academics | Science fiction critics | World Fantasy Award-winning writers | 20th-century American non-fiction writers | 21st-century American non-fiction writers | Male speculative fiction editors




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