Jade Dragon Temple - en.LinkFang.org

Jade Dragon Temple


Jade Dragon Temple
玉龙山天恩寺
Religion
AffiliationBuddhism, Confucianism, Taoism
DistrictSibu District
Location
LocationSibu
StateSarawak
CountryMalaysia
Geographic coordinates
Architecture
TypeChinese temple
Date established2004
Completed2009
Construction costRM60 million[1][2]

The Jade Dragon Temple (Chinese: 玉龙山天恩寺), also known as Yu Lung San Tien En Si,[3] is a Chinese temple located at KM26 of Sibu-Bintulu Road in Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia. The temple housing the places of worship for Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism, with the temple complex is considered as the largest not only in Malaysia but believed to be the largest in Southeast Asia as well.[1][2][3]

Contents

History


The temple complex was constructed in October 2004 through the idea of an 70-year-old Hii Siew Onn who managing the temple committees in Bintulu and Miri. The temple materials were mostly imported from China and constructed jointly by Chinese nationals and native Ibans.[1]

Features


Each of the temple building has a large hall housing statues of Gautama Buddha, Smiling Buddha, Dashizi Bodhisattva and the four-faced Goddess among the many Chinese deities.[1] Other section in the temple include a cultural and resource centre, two bell-and-drum towers, a theatre and a hall where the sutras are kept, Chinese zodiac garden, 7 Heavenly Sisters, as well as a lodging house and restaurant.[1]

References


  1. ^ a b c d e Philip Hii (13 November 2009). "Malaysia's largest temple complex opens to public" . The Star. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  2. ^ a b Andy Chua (9 May 2010). "Sojourn in Sibu" . The Star. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Yu Lung San Tien En Si (Jade Dragon Temple), Sibu" . Sarawak Tourism. Archived from the original on 19 February 2019. Retrieved 19 February 2019.

External links









Categories: Religious buildings and structures completed in 2009 | Chinese-Malaysian culture | Buddhist temples in Malaysia | Confucian temples in Malaysia | Taoist temples in Malaysia | Buildings and structures in Sarawak | Tourist attractions in Sarawak | 21st-century Buddhist temples | 21st-century Taoist temples




Information as of: 08.06.2020 07:32:30 CEST

Source: Wikipedia (Authors [History])    License : CC-by-sa-3.0

Changes: All pictures and most design elements which are related to those, were removed. Some Icons were replaced by FontAwesome-Icons. Some templates were removed (like “article needs expansion) or assigned (like “hatnotes”). CSS classes were either removed or harmonized.
Wikipedia specific links which do not lead to an article or category (like “Redlinks”, “links to the edit page”, “links to portals”) were removed. Every external link has an additional FontAwesome-Icon. Beside some small changes of design, media-container, maps, navigation-boxes, spoken versions and Geo-microformats were removed.

Please note: Because the given content is automatically taken from Wikipedia at the given point of time, a manual verification was and is not possible. Therefore LinkFang.org does not guarantee the accuracy and actuality of the acquired content. If there is an Information which is wrong at the moment or has an inaccurate display please feel free to contact us: email.
See also: Legal Notice & Privacy policy.