Parish (administrative division)


A parish is an administrative division used by several countries. To distinguish it from an ecclesiastical parish, the term civil parish is used in some jurisdictions, as noted below.

The table below lists countries which use this administrative division:

Country or territory Local name Notes
Andorra Parròquia
Antigua and Barbuda Parish
Australia Parish [1]
Barbados Parish
Bermuda Parish
Canada New Brunswick Parish
Prince Edward Island Parish
Quebec Parish municipality
China Macau Freguesia / 堂區
Dominica Parish
Ecuador Parroquia
Estonia Vald
Georgia მუნიციპალიტეტი
Grenada Parish
Guernsey Parish
Ireland Civil parish In the Republic of Ireland, civil parishes continue to exist for statutory purposes only.
Jamaica Parish
Jersey Parish
Latvia Pagasts
Isle of Man Parish
Montserrat Parish
(Nordic countries) Municipality In Nordic countries, a rural administrative parish corresponds to the concept of socken, a predecessor to today's municipalities of Sweden, Finland, Norway and Denmark.
Portugal Freguesia
Russia Приход
Saint Kitts and Nevis Parish
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Parish
Spain (Asturias, Galicia) Parroquia
Ukraine Парафія
United Kingdom England Civil parish In all parts of the British Isles except Scotland and Wales, it is known as a civil parish to distinguish it from the ecclesiastical parish.[2] In England, a (civil) parish council may choose to rename itself as a town council or as a community council. In Northern Ireland, civil parishes continue to exist for statutory purposes only.
Northern Ireland Civil parish
Scotland (formerly) Civil parish
Scotland Community
Wales Community
United States Louisiana Parish The term "county" is used in 48 US states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.[3]
South Carolina (formerly) Parish Until the late 19th century, the South Carolina Lowcountry was divided into parishes, but today all of South Carolina is divided into counties.[4]
Venezuela Parroquia

See also


References


  1. ^ "Parish and historical maps" . Land & Property Information. Government of New South Wales. 2012. Archived from the original on 5 January 2015. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  2. ^ "In praise of ... civil parishes" . The Guardian. 16 May 2011.
  3. ^ "An Overview of County Government" . National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on April 17, 2013. Retrieved April 25, 2013.
  4. ^ The Newberry Library (2009). "South Carolina: Individual County Chronologies, South Carolina Atlas of Historical County Boundaries" . publications.newberry.org. Chicago, Illinois, US. Retrieved June 5, 2018.







Categories: Civil parishes | Types of administrative division




Information as of: 06.07.2021 12:15:22 CEST

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